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Sunday, July 19, 2020 | History

3 edition of Biology and management of dwarf mistletoe in lodgepole pine in the Rocky Mountains found in the catalog.

Biology and management of dwarf mistletoe in lodgepole pine in the Rocky Mountains

by Frank G. Hawksworth

  • 52 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station in Fort Collins, Colo .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Lodgepole pine -- Rocky Mountains,
  • Dwarf mistletoes -- Rocky Mountains,
  • Lodgepole pine -- Diseases and pests -- Rocky Mountains

  • Edition Notes

    StatementFrank G. Hawksworth, David W. Johnson
    SeriesGeneral technical report RM -- 169
    ContributionsJohnson, David W. 1940-, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Fort Collins, Colo.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination38 p. :
    Number of Pages38
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17994398M

    Biology and management of dwarf mistletoe in lodgepole pine in the Rocky Mountains. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort Collins, Colo. USDA For. Serv., Gen. Tech. Rep. RM Hawksworth, FG, Johnson, DW () Biology and management of dwarf mistletoe in lodgepole pine in the Rocky Mountains. Fort Collins, CO: US Dept. of Agriculture Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (RM). Google Scholar.

    Hawksworth, F.G., and Johnson, D.W. Biology and management of dwarf mistletoe in lodgepole pine in the Rocky Mountains. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort Collins, Colo. Google Scholar. Jour- nal of Wildlife Management 29 Mason, D. T. a. The life history of lodgepole pine in the Rocky Mountains. U.S. Department of Agricul- ture Bulletin , 35 p. Washington, D.C. Mason, D. T. b. Utilization and management of lodgepole pine in the Rocky Mountains. U.S. Depart- ment of Agriculture Bulletin , 54 p.

    appreciable new infections are visible. Lodgepole pine regeneration as small as 30 cm tall can be visibly infected. In lodgepole pine stands, spread of dwarf mistletoe into young trees is more extensive from single, isolated residual trees than from relatively uniform, dense, even-aged stands of residual trees. The health of forests in the western US has significantly declined over the past century because of natural and human-induced changes in the disturbance regimes caused by fire, logging, and outbreaks of insects and diseases. Mistletoes and stem rusts are two of the most common and serious pathogens in western forests. Scientists are developing and communicating .


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Biology and management of dwarf mistletoe in lodgepole pine in the Rocky Mountains by Frank G. Hawksworth Download PDF EPUB FB2

Biology and management of dwarf mistletoe in lodgepole pine in the Rocky Mountains. Fort Collins, Colo.: U.S. Dept.

of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, [] (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors.

Biology and management of dwarf mistletoe in lodgepole pine in the Rocky Mountains. Author(s): Hawksworth, F. G.; Johnson, D. Author Affiliation: Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, USDA Forest Service, Fort Collins, COby: Biology and management of dwarf mistletoe in lodgepole pine in the Rocky Mountains [microform] / Frank G.

Hawksworth, David W. Johnson U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station Fort Collins, Colo Australian/Harvard Citation. Biology and management of dwarf mistletoe in lodgepole pine in the Rocky Mountains by Hawksworth, Frank G., ; Johnson, David W.

(David Winslow), ; Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Fort Collins, Colo.)Pages: Biology and management of dwarf mistletoe in lodgepole pine in the Rocky Mountains / Frank G. Hawksworth, David W. Johnson. By Frank G.

Hawksworth. Abstract. 38 p. Topics: Lodgepole pine--Rocky Mountains., Dwarf mistletoes--Rocky Mountains., Lodgepole pine Author: Frank G. Hawksworth. Though widely considered to be one of the most damaging agents in lodgepole pine forests of the Rocky Mountains (e.g., Hawksworth and Wiens, ; van der Kamp and Hawksworth, ), its role as a contributor to biological diversity in Rocky Mountain forests is now also being acknowledged (von Ahlefeldt and Speas, ).

Dwarf mistletoe, a common problem in Colorado forests, predominantly affects ponderosa and lodgepole pines, although they can attack Douglas-fir, piñon, limber and bristlecone pines. Dwarf mistletoes are parasites of native conifer forests that can cause severe damage. As suggested by its common name, lodgepole pine dwarf mistletoe, also called American dwarf mistletoe, (A.

americanum) grows primarily on lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), the characteristic two-needle pine species of much of the Rocky Mountains.

In Canada, this mistletoe can also infect Jack pine (P. banksiana) and in the western U.S. Dwarf mistletoe infection at the landscape scale is characterized by infection centers, as some stands have heavy mistletoe infection while stands of similar age have no mistletoe infection present.

If prescribed fires are used to restore the health of lodgepole pine forests, these fires will need to be intense, stand-replacing burns. RM-GTR Biology and management of dwarf mistletoe in lodgepole pine in the Rocky Mountains RM-GTR A screening procedure to evaluate air pollution effects on Class I wilderness areas.

Zimmerman GT, Laven RD. Ecological interrelationships of dwarf mistletoe and fire in lodgepole pine forests. In: Biology of dwarf mistletoes: Proceedings of the symposium; Aug.

8; Fort Collins, CO, pp. – Fort Collins, CO: USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. Hawksworth FG; Johnson DW, Biology and management of dwarf mistletoe in lodgepole pine in the Rocky Mountains.

General Technical Report - Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, USDA Forest Service, No. RMii + 38 pp. Hawksworth FG; Wiens D, Dwarf Mistletoes: Biology, Pathology, and Systematics. Agriculture.

lodgepole pine dwarf mistletoe and 7 or 8 yea rs for southwestern dwarf mistletoe. Vectors of dwarf mistletoes Nicholls et al. () provided. Lodgepole pine dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium americanum), an aggressive parasite of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta subsp.

latifolia), is limited, in the Central Rocky Mountains, to montane host “islands.”We sought to quantify the effect of the insularity and life history of A. americanum on its population genetic structure by considering three questions:.

The major dwarf mistletoes covered in this guide book are: Lodgepole pine dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium americanum); Biology and management of dwarf mistletoe in lodgepole pine in the Rocky Mountains. U.S.D.A. For. Serv., Gen. Tech. Rep., RM A. americanum (lodgepole pine dwarf mistletoe) • lodgepole pine: Ave = m (35 ft) Coincides with host tree ranges.

campylopodum (western dwarf mistletoe) • ponderosa pine • Jeffrey pine: Ave = m (35 ft) Coincides with host tree ranges. Several other factors cause similar brooming.

cyanocarpum (limber pine dwarf mistletoe). Hawksworth FG, Johnson DW () Biology and management of dwarf mistletoe in lodgepole pine in the Rocky Mountains.

General Technical Report RM, US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort Collins, CO, 38 p Google Scholar. Lodgepole pine dwarf mistletoe (A.

americanum) is very common throughout the range of lodgepole pine, and also occasionally infects ponderosa, whitebark, and Jeffrey pines. americanum does not infect shore pine, however shore pine dwarf mistletoe (A. tsugense subsp. contortae) is found in British Columbia and the San Juan Islands of.

Lodgepole Pine Dwarf Mistletoe Frank G. Hawksworth1 and Oscar J. Dooling 2 Lodgepole pine dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium americanum Nutt. ex Engelm.) is a native, parasitic, seed plant that occurs essentially through-out the range of lodgepole pine in North America. It is the most damag-ing disease agent in lodgepole pine, causing severe.

lodgepole pine t(;nds to be replaced by more shade tolerant species, e.g., Engelmann spruce and subalpine fire.

In the Montane and sub­ alpine zones of the Rocky Mountains, fire interrupts this succession and initiates another stand of lodgepole pine. In mixed stands, the proportion of lodgepole pine will increase with each recurring fire.

The dwarf mistletoe problem, however, was greatly overshadowed by a mountain pine beetle epidemic (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) that killed most lodgepole pine trees greater than 8 .Get this from a library!

Simulating yields of managed, dwarf mistletoe-infested lodgepole pine stands. [Clifford A Myers; Frank G Hawksworth; James Laning Stewart; United States. Department of Agriculture.; Rocky Mountain Forest and.

Along Lake Dillon roads, surveys showed a dwarf mistletoe increase of 13% from – Some plots indicated as much as a 70% increase over the same time period.

When combined with comandra blister rust, nearly 85% percent of the lodgepole pine trees in the Lake Dillon survey had a pre-existing stress factor.